Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Past and Present Research Systems of Green Chemistry Orlando, USA.

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Day 3 :

  • Track 5: Green Chemical Solvents
    Track 7: New Ideas for Non Toxic By-Products
    Track 9: Industrial Applications of Green Chemistry
    Track 12: Green Chemistry and Engineering
Location: Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport

Session Introduction

Feng Xu

Merck Research Laboratories, USA

Title: Green by design for process evolution: Asymmetric syntheses of vibegron
Speaker
Biography:

Feng Xu obtained his PhD at Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry (SIOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1989 where he worked on the total synthesis of complex natural products. He joined SIOC before moving to the USA. After he undertook a postdoctoral fellow with Professors Martin Kuehne and James Dittami, and completed the total syntheses of several complex indole alkaloids, he joined Merck Process Research Department in 1996.

Abstract:

Vibegron is a potent and selective beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonist and a drug candidate currently in clinical trials for the treatment of overactive bladder. In addition to the initial discovery chemistry route, two generations of asymmetric syntheses of vibegron are described in this presentation. The evolution of the two asymmetric routes suitable for the large scale preparation of vibegron is driven by the desire to develop a greener chemistry through the design of efficient chemical transformations / bond connections as well as process optimization. In comparison with the 1st generation route, the 2nd generation synthesis also reduces the manufacturing cost significantly.

Speaker
Biography:

Abel E Navarro received his PhD degree in Biomolecular Chemistry at New York University. Now, as a junior Faculty member at BMCC, he is developing new bioremediation alternatives for the elimination of pollutants from wastewaters as biodegradable and recyclable materials that can compete with currently available techniques. Navarro has a publication record of more than 50 articles in specialized and peer-reviewed journals and is members of several Editorial Boards. Navarro would like to thank BMCC and PNICP (project ECIP-1-P-042-14) for the financial support. This project was also sponsored by UPRRP Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainability and the HSI-STEM grant from the US Department of Education.

Abstract:

The growth of pharmaceutical industries and the constant development of more potent and selective drugs has created a major concern about the proper disposal of these substances. Antibiotics, analgesic and other drugstore products have been listed as top priority pollutants by the US-EPA and other international agencies. On the other hand, biodegradable adsorbents are being developed for the treatment of contaminated waters due to their low cost and efficiency in the removal of organic and inorganic pollutants. This research proposes the use of different types of Puerto Rican marine algae and hydrogel beads of alginate and chitosan for the bioremoval of antibiotics: Enrofloxacin, Amoxicillin, Penicillin G and other drugs such as caffeine. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the experimental conditions at which the adsorption of these compounds are is maximized. Parameters such as pH, salinity, adsorbent dose, initial drug concentration, and the presence of interfering substances were studied at room temperature. Results indicate that raw brown algae Sargassum sp. is the best adsorbent under the working conditions and can be easily applied to real wastewaters. Conversely, caffeine only showed a decent adsorption with hydrogel beads, reporting a preference for chitosan hydrogel beads. Finally, adsorbents were characterized by chemical and instrumental techniques to explore the adsorption mechanism. These results provide further insight into the application of marine algae and derivatives as potential adsorbents for pharmaceutical products, as an inexpensive and eco-friendly alternative.

Diego Gamba Sánchez

Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

Title: Atom Economic Synthesis of Amides
Speaker
Biography:

Diego Gamba obtained his B.Sc from UNAL – Bogotá in 2004, then his master degree working on a new tandem reaction ring closing/fluorination of allylamines in superacid medium, supervised by Dr. Sebastien Thibaudeau in 2006. Later he moved to the Ecole Polytechnique-Palaiseau and joined the group of Dr. Joëlle Prunet where he finished his PhD working on diastereoselective synthesis of 1,3-diols and Pummerer reaction oriented to the synthesis of nucleoside analogues. After one year of postdoc with Prof. Thorsten Bach, he moved back to Colombia in 2011 and joined the Chemistry Department of the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá where he started his independent. His research interests are total synthesis of natural products and the development of new organic transformations using biological and organic catalyst.

Abstract:

Amides are incontestably one of the most important functional groups in organic chemistry; they are present in a huge number of natural occurring structures and synthetic molecules with diverse usages. Besides amide synthesis by classical methods is one of the most used synthetic procedures in pharmaceutical industry, on the other hand ACS has recognized atom economy in amide synthesis as on the most important challenges to overcome in synthetic organic chemistry. The research described in this presentation will underline fundamental problems in amide synthesis and will also show different approaches using catalyst for transamidation of carboxamides, transamidation of thioamides and direct amidation of carboxylic acids. These three methodologies can be placed in a green context and will be discussed as alternative atom economic procedures for classical methods in amide synthesis.

Speaker
Biography:

Cecilia Sambusiti completed her PhD in March 2013 from Politecnico of Milan (Italy). Actually, she is engaged in a Postdoctoral work at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA, UMRIATE) in Montpellier (France). She has an academic background in environmental engineering combined with a practical work experience in catalytic processes (mechanical, thermal, chemical and enzymatic) and biological processes (anaerobic digestion, dark fermentation, ethanol fermentation). She is author and co-author of 13 refereed journal publications, 1 book chapter, and 10 international refereed conference publications.

Abstract:

The presence of bark in wood can constitute a serious limitation for the bioconversion of forest residues into bioethanol, especially due to the presence of high content of extractives, which may inhibit ethanol fermentation. However, a perfectly debarked wood chip may not represent an economical source of carbohydrates for industrial applications. An option is to utilise bark as a source of renewable energy and chemicals, within a biorefinery platform. In this study, enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol fermentation of Douglas-fir bark were studied before and after organosolv and diluted acid pre-treatments performed at 150°C and 180°C. The recovery of valuable platforms molecules was also determined after pre-treatment. Results showed that an organosolv-free acid pre-treatment performed at 150°C gave the best results in terms of platforms molecules recovery (40% w/w) and bioethanol yield (2 g.100g-1 total solids). However, the low glucose and ethanol yields obtained (6% and 16% of the theoretical values, respectively) confirmed that enzymatic hydrolysis remains the limiting step of bioethanol fermentation from bark. Interestingly, ethanol was produced without inhibition of fermentation from the untreated and pretreated substrates.

Speaker
Biography:

Monlau Florian has completed his PhD in 2012 at the Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology in Narbonne (France) and his Postdoctoral researches (2013-2014) within the European Project “Star Agroenergy” part of the 7th Framework. During his research carrier, he worked on the application of pretreatments for enhancing biofuels production (i.e. biohydrogen, methane, bioethanol). He is currently a Post-doctoral researcher at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA, UMR IATE) in Montpellier (France). He is author and co-author of more than 12 papers published in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Lignocellulosic biomasses have been widely investigated for bioethanol production through biological processes. The recalcitrant structure of lignocellulosic biomass required a pretreatment step before enzymatic hydrolysis and/or bioethanol fermentation andthe most current pretreatment technology used are thermo-chemical pretreatment. Nonetheless, besides the production of accessible sugars, such pretreatments could also generate inhibitory compounds like furans (i.e. furfural and 5-HMF). Thus, a detoxification process is often required to avoid inhibition of biological processes. To date, several costly processes, including evaporation, adsorption or extraction, have been investigated. In this study, the use of two pyrochars, obtained through pyrolysis (at 600°C) of solid anaerobic digestate, was investigated as alternative of detoxification of a synthetic medium (glucose 10 g L-1, 5-HMF 1 g L-1, furfural 1 g L-1). Accessible surface areas of pyrochars ranged between 49 and 88 m2 g-1. With a pyrochar concentration of 40 g L-1, more than 94% of 5-HMF and 99% of furfural were removed. Furfural was adsorbed at a faster rate than 5-HMF, and totally removed after 3h of contact. Both pyrochars were found selective towards furans compounds, as the soluble sugar concentrations remained unchanged. Moreover, pyrochars were found efficient in the detoxification of a corn stalks hydrolysate (i.e. soluble sugars: 8.76 g L-1, furans: 3 g L-1) with more than 90% of furans removal, without affecting sugar concentrations. Finally, both pyrochars were applied for bioethanol production, according to various configurations: i) raw hydrolysate, ii) hydrolysate detoxification prior to fermentation, iii) hydrolysate detoxification simultaneously with fermentation.

Speaker
Biography:

Aurore Richel is professor and head of the Laboratory of Biological and Industrial Chemistry at the University of Liege – Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech. The laboratory is engaged in research and education in the fields of biological chemistry, biorefining and industrial technologies. A. Richel and her team are involved in numerous projects and industrial collaborations, specializing in the following areas: optimized use of vegetal biomass for biofuels and fine chemicals, pretreatments and cracking of lignocellulosic biomass and development of new methodologies with low environmental footprints.

Abstract:

Urban biorefining” is an original concept aiming at using urban wastes (household wastes, municipal wastes, industrial liquid and/or solid residues and side-products, etc.), mainly of vegetal origin, for the production of an array of biofuels and bioproducts. This “urban biorefining” concept fits particularly with the economic, geographic and politic contexts and constraints of the Walloon Region (south part of Belgium). Indeed, Walloon Region is a very small territory (area of about 6,504 sq mi) with a temperate climate. Supply feedstock, mainly arising form forestry and agriculture, are thus rather restricted, submitted to importation, and subjected to non-standardized quality. Several examples of our regional strategy, still available on an industrial scale, are herein proposed and detailed.

Carmen Najera

University of Alicante, Spain

Title: Cross-coupling reactions in aqueous media
Speaker
Biography:

Carmen Nájera has studied Chemisty at the University of Saragossa in 1973 and pursued PhD at the University of Oviedo in 1980. She performed Postdoctoral work at the ETH (Zurich), Dyson Perrins Laboratory (Oxford), Harvard University, and Uppsala University. She was Associate Professor at the University of Oviedo in 1985 and Prof. of Organic Chemistry at the University of Alicante in 1993. She is also managing director of MEDALCHEMY a spin-off of the University of Alicante devoted to R&D of APIs and new drugs. She has published more than 300 papers and supervised more than 40 PhD theses.

Abstract:

We have studied in the last 15 years the efficiency of oxime-derived palladacycles as pre-catalysts in carbon-carbon forming reactions such as, Heck, Suzuki, Stille, Hiyama, Ullmann, Sonogashira and Glaser reactions by in situ generation of palladium nanoparticles. Interestingly, they exhibit increasing catalytic activity when water is used as solvent due to the formation of three- and four-palladium atom clusters as has been recently found out by Corma and col. In this talk recent challenge applications of these palladacycles working in aqueous media will be presented. Matsuda-Heck reactions have been performed efficiently in water at rt. In the case of the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction, deactivated aryl chlorides and imidazolylsulfonates can be cross-coupled with boronic acids or potassium trifluoroborates using water as solvent. The copper-free Sonogashira reaction has been also performed with deactivated aryl chlorides and with aryl imidazolylsulfonates under copper-free conditions using water as solvent. The head to head dimerization of terminal alkynes in water allows the steroselective preparation of (E)-1, 4-enynes in the presence of an imidazolinium salt.

Speaker
Biography:

Marcelo E Domine completed his PhD at the Polytechnic University of Valencia (Spain) in 2003 under the guidance of Prof. A. Corma, and Postdoctoral studies at the IRCELYON Institute of CNRS (France, 2005-07). In 2008, he re-joined the Institute of Chemical Technology of Valencia (UPV-CSIC, Spain) as Scientific Researcher of CSIC.His current research involves the synthesis and characterization of solid catalysts and their application in sustainable chemical processes; mainly focusing on new biomass-derivatives transformations into valuable chemicals. He is co-author of 35 publications and more than 20 patent applications. He has presented over 10 invited conferences around the world. He currently is Guest Managing Editor of Catalysis Today, also acting as Reviewer in many renowned scientific journals in catalysis and fuels areas.

Abstract:

A wide range of renewable raw materials and compounds can be obtained from lignocellulosic biomass and their derivatives. One of these compounds is biomass-derived Succinic Acid (Bio-SA) which has been described as a strategic platform chemical, due to its potential as the C4 building block in industrial organic chemistry. Sustainability of SA production via fermentative synthesis was studied through two different processes (Myriant and Reverdia cases) and compared with the petrochemical route. Four groups of parameters, namely material efficiency, economics, energy efficiency and land use were considered for this green approach. Metrics calculations show that energy efficiency for Bio-SA production is slightly higher while material efficiency is rather lower when compared with the petrochemical counterpart (Ptr.SA). Remarkably, Bio-SA calculated costs (even in the worse case) are quite lower than the prices for Petr.SA and close to the price of maleic anhydride (MAN) used as raw material. Thus, bio-based SA production appears to be competitive with petrochemical route for MAN, this representing an economic advantage and an opportunity for decreasing of fossil oil dependency. Competitiveness of Bio-SA can be boosted by optimization of fermentative process, as well as by the transformation of Bio-SA into high added value chemicals, such as γ-butyrolactone (GBL). Following this idea, the use of Pd/Al2O3 as a promising and relatively cheap catalyst for the one-pot synthesis of GBL from Bio-SA (or its anhydride) under mild reaction conditions will be presented as affordable alternative for Bio-SA chemical upgrading.

Speaker
Biography:

Amit K Dutta obtained his PhD in Chemistry (2012) at the age of 28 years from Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, India. He is currently a Research Associate working under Prof. bibhutosh Adhikary, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur (Formerly Bengal Engineering and Science University), India. His current research interest is the preparation of semiconductor nanomaterials and their catalytic applications. He has published 24 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

This presentation reports simple, green and efficient synthesis of nano-scaled inorganic semiconducting materials such as metal oxide, sulfide and their utilization in environmental chemistry and medical diagnostics. Semiconducting nanomaterials as catalyst carriers is very promising due to their large surface to volume ratio, high catalyst loading capacity, outstanding stability and environmentally–friendly materials. In recent years, contamination of water by non-biodegradable organic pollutants is a serious and widespread issue. So the development of facile, cheap and green methods for treatment of organic pollutants has been a focal subject in the field of environmental science and technology. Different metal oxides and sulfides such as Fe2O3, Fe3O4, CuO, ZnO, FeS, CdS, ZnS, CuS etc. have been synthesized through simple, cost-effective single source precursor approach and have been found to exhibits visible–light–driven catalytic activity for the degradation of organic pollutants in the waste-water treatment plant. Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most promising owing to the presence of their interesting magnetic properties and were separated at the end of the reaction by their attraction to a magnetic field which is much easier than by cross–flow filtration and centrifugation. Besides, numerous efforts have been paid to develop an organic synthesis process be more simple, green, and efficient using nanomaterial-based visible-light driven photo-catalytic activity. In the field of medical diagnostic, these inorganic nanomaterials are used to construct glucose biosensor for precise monitoring of the human glucose level. Non–enzymatic electrochemical sensor has been fabricated by immobilizing the inorganic nanomaterials on the surface of glassy carbon electrode for detection and estimation of hydrogen peroxide in human urine.

Speaker
Biography:

AndrejaŽgajnarGotvajn obtained her PhD in the field of Chemical Engineering in 1998.She is Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and head of the Department of Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental engineering. Her research work is focuses on toxicitystudies in aquatic compartments, risk assessment and hazard identification of chemicals, wastewater treatment: Biological and advanced oxidation processes, etc. She participated in 6 national research projects; she is currently involved in the program Chemical Engineering. She also leads 4 bilateral research projects.In 2011 and 2012 she spent two months as a Visiting Professor and Researcher at Tulane University, School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine New Orleans, USA.

Abstract:

In the recent years, there has been intensive development of non-hazardous solvents and reaction media, able to replace common organic compounds which are possible aquatic contaminants due to their toxicity, volatility and persistency. As a result, Eutectic Solvents (ES) were introduced. However, they could spread widely by wastewaters and affect large areas in terms of acute and chronic toxicity. Because treatment of waste-water is usually based on biological processes the aim of the presented research focuses on the determination of the impact caused by the addition of selected ES to the aerobic WasteWater Treatment Plant (WWTP). Selected ES is based on choline chloride and malonic acid. Biodegradability of is usually determined using various non-standardized laboratory or pilot-scale long-term tests with activated sludge. First, its toxicity to microorganisms of activated sludge was and expanded also to other species, important for evaluation of environmental impact of selected ES. Then its biodegradability in common environmental conditions was determined to assess its pathways in natural environmental compartments. Then the pilot experiment was started with setting up pilot aerobic WWTP, feed by synthetic municipal wastewater and its efficiency was monitored using several parameters. After steady-state operation of WWTP was achieved, the increasing amount of ES was added in the influent and treatment efficiency was monitored continuously for 77 days. It has been confirmed that although the toxicity of ES to microorganisms was quite high, the impact ofthe biological treatment plant at the same concentrations was negligible.

Speaker
Biography:

Ewa Bogel Lukasik has completed her PhD from Warsaw University Technology, Poland. She was a Marie Curie Early Stage Researcher in QUILL, UK and Marie Curie Experience Researcher in iBET, Portugal. She is a Group Leader of Advanced fluids in tailor-made biofuel and bio-based product processing, New University of Lisbon. She is involved in COST Actions: Valorization of lignocellulosic biomass side streams for sustainable production of chemicals, materials and fuels using low environmental impact technologies FP1306, Emergence and Evolution of Complex Chemical Systems CM1304, Utilisation of Biomass for Sustainable Fuels & Chemicals CM0903. She has published 42 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The undiscovered potential of lignocellulosic biomass to obtain a variety of value-added products requires broad research to ensure the feasibility of lignocellulosic biorefineries. One of the major limitations of the biorefinery concept is the lack of an efficient biomass processing tool, which could compromise investment in this sector. Therefore, studies on biomass pretreatment and fractionation were developed to efficiently overcome the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and reduce costs of biorefinery processes. The main objective of current social and global need is to develop a range of innovative alternatives to the valorization of lignocellulosic residues to chemicals, fuels and materials making use of environmentally sound protocols from pretreatment/fractionation to conversion to valuable end products. The ionic liquid, IL, technology on biomass processing is relatively recent and first studies were focused on the lignocellulosic biomass dissolution in different ILs. The dissolution in IL drives to the structural changes in the regenerated biomass by reduction of cellulose crystallinity and lignin content contrasting to the original biomass. These findings provided ILs as tools to perform biomass pre-treatment and the advantageous use of their specific properties over the conventional pre-treatment processes. This presentation focuses on the critical outlook on the study of biomass dissolution and changes occurred in the biomass during this process as well as on the influence of several crucial parameters that govern the dissolution and further pre-treatment process.

Speaker
Biography:

Vilas Ravat has completed his PhD from Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India. Postdoctoral studies from University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. He is research scientist at Reliance Technology Group, Mumbai. He has published more than 13 papers in reputed journals. His research interest includes mesoporous, zeolite and carbon based catalysts for green routes of fine chemical synthesis, hydroprocessing and environmental applications.

Abstract:

Carbon materials are excellent supports from an industrial point of view due their wide availability and environmental acceptability. They are stable in both acidic and basic environments and allow facile recovery of the precious metals by burning off the carbon after catalyst deactivation. Recently, shaped carbon nanomaterial (HCSs, CNFs, CSs, CNTs etc) have attracted a lot of attention as supports for metal nanoparticles. The deposition of active metal on shaped carbon nanomaterial affords advantageous substrates because most of the metal nanoparticles are expected to be exposed and accessible to the reactant. However, for selective deposition of metal require heteroatom activation of carbon which increases dispersion and stability of metal particles. Shaped carbon nanomaterials have recently been demonstrated to be promising metal-free alternatives for low-cost catalytic processes. Among the various heterogeneous catalysts, Pd and Pt supported shaped carbon nanomaterial catalysts have attracted much attention due to their availability for various green routes of fine chemical synthesis. However, ACs are still widely chosen as hydrogenation, electrolysis and oxidation catalyst supports due to their ease of preparation and low cost. The challenge remains to improve the cost-effectiveness of shaped carbon nanomaterial to make them an economically acceptable alternative to ACs as supports for chemical reactions.

Speaker
Biography:

Vinod Kumar was born at Amritsar (Punjab) INDIA on 31st December, 1958. He did his M.Sc. from M.D. University, Rohtak (INDIA) in the year 1979 with specialization in Physical chemistry. He did his PhD from the same university in the year 1983. He joined the Department of chemistry, M.D. University, Rohtak as senior lecturer in 1989 from where he elevated to the post of professor in 2005. At present he is Head of the Department. Prof. Kumar has published 125 Research papers in journals of international repute. He has attended about 40 National/International conferences and supervised 15 PhD students. His major area of research is “Thermodynamics of liquid mixtures”.

Abstract:

Large quantities of liquids or their mixtures are used as solvents for numerous processes in chemical and related industries; thus the challenge of non-harmful solvents, because of new environmental regulations, has promoted great developments of innovative products like ionic liquids to protect the environment. Over the last decades liquids or their mixtures have been characterized on the basis of their thermodynamic properties. Consequently, the need for a deep knowledge of thermodynamic properties of liquid mixtures has appeared driven both by technological and social demands. Now a day, the interest for industrial multi-component processes is increasing and thus, thermodynamic studies of ionic liquid mixtures are being developed in parallel to industrial advances, contributing to design, improvement and output of the processes. In view of this, we report densities and speeds of sound data of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (1) + water (2) + formamide or N,N- dimethylformamide (3) ternary mixtures over entire composition range at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 K. The heat capacities, Cp of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, water, formamide and N,N- dimethylformamide have also been measured at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 K using micro differential scanning calorimeter. The measured data have been utilized to determine excess molar volumes and excess isentropic compressibilities values. The topology of the constituent molecules (Graph theory) has been utilized to determine excess molar volumes and excess isentropic compressibilities values. Results obtained indicate that experimental and calculated values are in good agreement.

Gannu Praveen Kumar

Sahasra Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, India

Title: Green chemistry as a tool to prevent pharmaceutical hazards and pollution
Speaker
Biography:

Gannu Praveen Kumar, Professor and Principal in Sahasra Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences since April 2014, graduated from H.K.E’s society college of Pharmacy, Gulbarga University in 1997, post graduation from BITS, Pilani in 1999 and Ph.D from UCPSC, kakatiya university in 2009. He worked as assistant professor for Vaagdevi college of Pharmacy, from 1999 - 2005, as Associate professor for SR college of Pharmacy from 2008-2010, as Professor and HOD for Talla Padmavathi college of Pharmacy from 2010-2011 and as Professor & HOD for St. Peter’s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences from 2011 to 2014. Since 2009, he was appointed as an external examiner for post graduation and has guided 30 M. Pharm students. He has published in both National and International journals and compiled few chapters for text books. He received Gem of India award in the year 1999. He was selected as a best academician of Vaagdevi college of Pharmacy in 2002 and of Talla Padmavathi college of Pharmacy in 2011. He is an advisor for few pharmaceutical companies. He visited foreign countries like London, Dubai, Singapore, Malaysia and Spain as invited speaker.

Abstract:

Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process. Green chemistry has grown from a small idea into a new approach to the scientifically based environmental protection. By using green chemistry procedures, we can minimize the waste of materials, maintain the atom economy and prevent the use of hazardous chemicals. Researchers and pharmaceutical companies need to be encouraged to consider the principles of green chemistry while designing the processes and choosing reagents.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmed Elshazly is from Institute of Chemical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Vietnam.

Abstract:

In this study, a novel Mg-Al-Cl and Mg-Fe-Cl beads were developed for removal of hexavalent chromium. The Mg-Al-Cl and Mg-Fe-Cl beads were generated by impregnating synthetic Mg-Fe-Cl and Mg-Al-Cl (with a Mg:Fe, Mg:Al molar ratio 3:1) into alginate/PVA-glutaraldehyde gel bead. The adsorption of chromate and arsenate onto the Mg-Al-Cl and Mg-Fe-Cl beads were investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch tests. The adsorption kinetics of chromate and arsenate onto Mg-Al-Cl and Mg-Fe-Cl beads were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model and adsorption data fitted well to a Langmuir isotherm. Langmuir monolayer capacities were 1.4721 mg Cr/g and1.7737 mg As/g for Mg-Al-Cl beads and 1.3587 mg Cr/g and 1.6439 mg As/g for Mg-Fe-Cl beads. The removal efficiency of chromate by Mg-Al-Cl and Mg-Fe-Cl beads was 92.5% and 90.0% for the initial solution concentrations of 45 mg Cr/L, respectively. The efficiency of arsenate removal was 91.19% for Mg-Al-Cl beads and 79.08 for Mg-Fe-Cl beads at initial concentration of 50 mg As/L. Hence, the Mg-Al-Cl and Mg-Fe-Cl beads developed in this study can be used as promising adsorbents for simultaneous removal of chromate from industrial waste water or groundwater containing these contaminants.

  • Young Doctors Research Forum
Location: Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport
Speaker
Biography:

Katarina Fabicovicova is a PhD candidate in the field of technical chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis and reaction engineering on University of Technology Darmstadt in Germany. She is working under supervision of Prof. Peter Claus on the utilization of biomass, especially cellulose into valuable chemicals. She has completed her Master degree in chemical engineering at the University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia

Abstract:

Cellulose is the most abundant and non edible biopolymer of the world. Therefore, the utilization of this macromolecule and its integration in a bio-refinery concept is essential even in the near future of growing global shortage of crude oil. Herein we present results of the one-pot hydrogenolysis of cellulose to valuable chemicals, especially polyols, using supported bifunctional catalysts. The hydrogenolysis of cellulose under hydrothermal conditions in the presence of solid catalysts yields ethylene glycol and other valuable polyols such as propylene glycol, butanediol, and sorbitol. Besides our highly active nickel-tungsten catalysts [1], our ongoing research is focused on the development of stable catalyst systems and reaction engineering aspects of biomass conversion to chemicals. Optimization of reaction conditions, recycling tests for catalysts and different cellulose-pretreatment methods such as ball-milling gave a very promising catalyst, namely Ru-W on activated carbon (AC) [2]. Over the Ru-W/AC catalyst, which was ball-milled with cellulose for a very short time (4 minutes), the cellulose conversion of 100 % and overall polyols yield of 84 % within 3 hours reaction time could be achieved (493 K, hydrogen pressure of 65 bar, low catalyst/cellulose ratio (1/10)). The catalyst was also tested for its re-usability in a recycling test which showed a very good stability in six runs. Characterization of catalysts was undertaken for a better understanding of structure and performance of catalyst. Finally, first experiments showed that the optimized conditions can be successfully applied to the hydrogenolysis of real biomass. At very high conversion the product distribution depends on the individual biomass type. With application of a pretreatment method, we can influence the product distribution and increase the overall polyols yield by the hydrogenolysis of raw biomass.

Speaker
Biography:

Dominik Götz has completed his MSc in 2013 at the Technical University Darmstadt (Germany). Since 2014 he is working on his PhD in the group of Prof. Dr. Peter Claus. His main fields of research are the conversion of bio-derived platform chemicals especially using trickle bed reactors as well as the modelling of these reactors using CFD tools.

Abstract:

1,2-pentanediol (1,2-PeD) is widely used as a monomer for polyesters, as a key intermediate of low-toxic microbicides and is an ingredient of various cosmetic products. Nowadays, fossil non-renewable resources are the common basis for the production of chemicals and fuels. In this context, 1,2-PeD is currently produced via a cost-intensive multistep route by selective oxidation of pentene to pentene oxide and a subsequent hydrolysis. The displacement of exhaustible raw materials through biomass as a sustainable source of energy and organic carbon is clearly desirable. While the direct selective conversion of biomass into valuable chemicals is still a challenging research topic, various bulk chemicals like furfuryl alcohol (FA) are already available via established production routes. Since FA can be converted into 1,2-PeD by aqueous phase hydrogenolysis, it is representing a promising alternative and sustainable production route for 1,2-PeD. But so far most of the catalysts reported for the hydrogenolysis of FA are lacking of disadvantages either in regard of their toxicity (e.g. copper chromite), the need of additives or special solvents (e.g. adams's catalyst) or industrial applicability. In contrast to the aforementioned, supported ruthenium catalysts are non-toxic as well as stable against water under hydrothermal conditions. In order to assure high throughput and a constant product quality a continuous operation mode is clearly desirable for an industrial application. The trickle bed reactor is representing a promising concept due to its simple and robust build-up while exhibiting a good selectivity for the main products.

Speaker
Biography:

Viet Tu Nguyen is currently a PhD candidate majored in Resources Recycling at the Korea University of Science and Technology (UST). His research deals with metals separation and purification from primary and secondary resources using novel solvent extraction based ionic liquids.

Abstract:

The present research focused on the use of phosphonium-based ionic liquid to improve the existing solvent extraction process from the environmental benign point of view for the extraction and separation of platinum group metals (PGMs). The studies carried out with [P66614+]Cl–[Cyphos IL 101] diluted in xylene showed the selective extraction of both Pd(II) and Pt(IV) from the solution containing 55 mg/L Pd(II) and 100 mg/L Pt(IV) in 0.1 mol/L HCl by anion exchange mechanism leaving Rh(III) in the raffinate. McCabe-Thiele diagram revealed the quantitative extraction of Pd(II) and Pt(IV) with 0.6 g/L Cyphos IL 101 within two counter-current stages at O/A of 3/2 at 298 K. The species formed in the organic phase at different acidities of the aqueous phases were also determined with Job’s method and elucidated by proton NMR and FTIR spectra. The negative standard enthalpy estimated by Vant’ Hoff equation demonstrated the exothermic nature of extraction for both metals. The Pt(IV) and Pd(II) from the loaded organic was selectively stripped with NaSCN and acidic thiourea solutions respectively. Particularly, two counter-current stages are needed for quantitative stripping of Pt(IV) with 0.1 mol/L NaSCNat O/A of 2; whereas total stripping of Pd(II) with 0.01 mol/L acidic thiourea requires only one stage at O/A of 1. In addition, a series of extraction-stripping up to 5 cycles showed a possible recirculation of used solvent without loss of performance. Simulations of the counter-current modes also revealed the possibility of using phosphonium based ionic liquid for the selective separation and recovery of PGMs from acidic chloride solutions in continuous mode.